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Doing the Right Thing

Discussion in 'Miami Dolphins Forum' started by ckparrothead, Jan 10, 2008.

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  1. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    There is a rumor out there that Tony Sparano would prefer to become the next Head Coach of the Baltimore Ravens over the Miami Dolphins.

    Good. That's a sign that Sparano has what it takes to be a good Head Coach at the NFL level.

    Have I become anti-fan? No. Have I become one of those people that believe the Dolphins roster is so woefully flawed that whomever chooses to coach the Dolphins is destined to fail? No. Am I drunk? Yes. Well, no...I was joking...honest.

    Being an NFL Head Coach in the league of "win yesterday" blogophiles, as Boomer correctly puts it, isn't just about being a leader. It isn't just about X's and O's. It is a position of decision-making. It is a league where one false step can ruin a franchise, and indeed ruin your career.

    Look at Nick Saban. He was a leader, respected (and feared) by the locker room and coaches alike. He certainly had his defensive X's and O's down, and I'm willing to bet his thoughts on the offensive side of the football were not half-bad, either. He even made a boatload of decent decisions. But in the end, prior to his slithering off to Alabama, it took only a few bad decisions to ruin what could have been a much more pleasant campaign that could have seen him stick it out at least as long as Jimmy Johnson did. One of the bad decisions, we all know about. We all know how costly that one was. I'm guilty, I was convinced it was the right decision. Many were. Saban wanted to go with Drew Brees, he let doctors and personnel men talk him out of it. But the few other fatal bad decisions were not so obvious. For one, he underestimated how long it would be before Scott Linehan would get a Head Coach job. He knew Scott would leave eventually, and he wanted to have an understudy in place that could take over when he did. He pulled a hot, young talent to do just that in Jason Garrett. He also knew that the aged Hudson Houck wouldn't be around forever, so he pulled an understudy for him in Tim Davis. But, when Linehan left prematurely, he was faced with a decision. He could promote Garrett, who was still wet behind the ears after his first year as a position coach, or he could be a name whore. Saban chose to be a name whore, and grabbed Mike Mularkey. It was the opposite of Bill Parcells' now-famous "cronyism". Of course, he did the same on the defensive side of the ball. Instead of enticing another young understudy in Will Muschamp, a coach he had experience with that shared Saban's philosophies, to be Miami's full-fledged defensive coordinator, he went after the name. Dom Capers, of course, has since proven that the game may have passed him by since the last time he was a successful defensive coordinator without a defensive head coach holding his hand (which was 1999). Just a few bad decisions could cause such misfortune as occurred in 2006, misfortune that led to ugliness in the form of a resignation, a horrifying reputation in the national media, and the loss of a philosophy and level of competence that, without which, caused the Dolphins to become one of the worst teams in the league.

    If becoming a successful NFL Head Coach is all about decision-making, the most important decisions to be made are undoubtedly toward the beginning of your tenure, when credibility is low and hard to come by, and the currency you must use to buy it is purely measured in terms of wins. It also follows that the most important decision you make in your head coaching career, could be the decision you make before you even become a Head Coach.

    In years past, it was considered a major faux pas to pass on consideration for an NFL Head Coach position. The NFL is seeing a growing trend in this previously taboo practice for a reason. Nick Saban practically had to be promised 70 virgins and a solid gold toilet in order to be lured to Miami, he demanded so much control over every facet in the organization. Other assistant coaches are now regularly taking their names out of consideration for Head Coach jobs, if they feel they will be on uncertain footing and are forced to accept certain aspects of the organization that they have no control over. We saw several assistants withdraw their names from consideration for the Raiders job. Several more have withdrawn their names from consideration here in Miami.

    What happened to the 2007 Miami Dolphins should serve to increase that trend. I am not here to hold a torch for Cam Cameron. He made some decent decisions, some bad decisions, and some terrible decisions. However, his string of bad decisions started first and foremost before he became the Head Coach of the Miami Dolphins. It started when he accepted the job.

    Cameron accepted a position that he had no business accepting. The "brain trust" (if you are really comfortable calling it that) insisted that as a prerequisite for his hire, he would be willing to accept Randy Mueller as General Manager, and the vast majority of defensive, special teams, and even offensive coaching assistants. He also was forced to promise that he would keep the defensive personnel mostly in tact. To add to matters, rather than having one person with final say over personnel matters, he was to accept a situation where both he and Randy Mueller must accept every move, and arguments were to be judged by monument of football wisdom Bryan Wiedmeier (whose experience is mostly based in the salary cap, contracts and business end).

    I'm sure the optimist in Cameron, and he is always the optimist, thought deep down that he would be graded on the things that he could control, the decisions he was allowed to make. He thought he would be graded on the success of the offense's turnaround, which was going well until they lost their starting quarterback, number one receiver, and franchise tailback, a trio of losses that would send any offense reeling. The problem is, he was wrong. He was absolutely wrong. In today's NFL, in yesterday's NFL, the Head Coach is responsible for the bottom line. He was responsible for the job that his assistants were doing, even if those assistants were shoved down his throat as a prerequisite for taking the job. He is the Head Coach, it is all on him.

    The whole situation was a recipe for pure disaster, and if Cam Cameron were qualified to be a good Head Coach, he probably would have said "No, thanks." The fact that he did not, probably foreshadowed the string of questionable decisions that ensued.

    So, I am sure you guys can understand now what I am trying to say about Tony Sparano, that if he is going to be a good Head Coach, he should probably prefer the Ravens to the Dolphins. The question is, why? Were we not supposed to cure this problem with 500 Lbs Gorilla Bill Parcells?

    I am quite sure I will yet again be accused of being a Parcells hater. I am not. I have ultimate respect for his success at the NFL level. I also think his personnel ideas and ideas on how to structure an organization have the chance to be great, not just good. The fact of the matter is, the last time Bill Parcells played the role he is now charged with playing, he ended up identifying the man who may go down as the best Head Coach in NFL history (rightly or wrongly), Bill Belichick. He is certainly in the Top 5, and recent fan polling suggests he is second only to Joe Gibbs (which may actually suggest the flawed nature of such polls).

    The problem? Bill Belichick is coaching the PATRIOTS, not the JETS. Belichick's impressive record as a leader, coordinator, and especially decision-maker, started right at the beginning, when he ripped up his contract with the Jets and went to the New England Patriots.

    Why did he do it? The biggest reason was that, in the end, he just did not buy this situation where Bill Parcells was going to be standing behind him as the General Manager of the football team, pulling the strings and giving everyone the perception that Belichick is nothing more than a puppet. Was he right not to buy it? Absolutely.

    The next man that Parcells tabbed to be his Head Coach was Al Groh. I've spoken with several Jets fans and even bloggists about what happened up there. The Jets ended that 2000 season at 9-7, having parlayed a red hot 6-1 start into a 3-6 finish characterized by a lost locker room, lost discipline, and general disorder. Players were grousing about Al Groh before they went on the final 0-3 run that lost them a shot at the playoffs. When Groh announced that he would be leaving the football team to join the Virginia Cavaliers in the college ranks, the writing was already pretty much on the wall. Local media were already speculating about his dismissal.

    Now, I'm not trying to say that Bill Belichick and Al Groh are the same creature, by any means. The fact of the matter is, however, that the situation Groh was forced to accept in New York greatly exacerbated a 9-7 record that was actually better than the 8-8 record Parcells had led them to in 1999 after Testeverde's achilles injury. The press were relentless in their pursuit of proof that Bill Parcells was acting as the team's puppet master, and that Al Groh was just playing his part. I truly believe that Bill Parcells meant well, as he pulled away from the team in the public eye. He stepped off the field on game days, and did his best to make it seem that his friend and underling, Al Groh, was the head honcho.

    But in the end, he failed where it counted most, the locker room. Anthony Becht recently spoke about Bill Parcells' profound effect on him early in his career. The problem? Becht was drafted in 2000, the year Parcells was supposed to be nothing more than a General Manager. Listen to some of Anthony Becht's comments.

    TO BE CONTINUED...
     
  2. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    CONTINUED...


    Seven years from now, is Ted Ginn, Jr. going to speak about Randy Mueller in similar terms? Is he going to thank Mueller for making him into the player he is today? Had he even had a single conversation with Mueller, before Randy was fired?

    What about Jeff Ireland? Will Isaiah Stanback some day sit at his locker and reminisce about how tough Jeff Ireland was on him in 2007, how often he spoke to him, how much of a profound effect Jeff Ireland has had on his career as a receiver?

    I'm guessing...no.

    This is the danger of the current setup. Bill Parcells can mean well, and have the best intentions, and they can still fall short simply by The Tuna being The Tuna. His reputation alone is enough to get players in the locker room respecting his authority more highly than Tony Sparano's, especially with Sparano's being a first time head coach. He's walking to a poker table with a $100 in chips, sitting next to a guy that has $5000. Which guy are the other players at the table more likely to respect and try and learn a thing or two from?

    Can a team succeed if their locker room feels like they have two masters? Of course it can, anything can happen. This is still a league where if you pick a card, any card, and you pick the red queen, you're still ahead of the game and the more W's you have the more right you feel with the world even if something is wrong. But will it be easy? I don't think so. Perhaps we should ask Al Groh if he would take another NFL job with Bill Parcells operating behind the scenes. We already know what Bill Belichick's answer is now, and was back in 2000.

    So what are the Dolphins to do? Can Parcells just step back even further, try even harder to let his front men Jeff Ireland and Tony Sparano take as big a role as they can? That could work, but it could also be pushing an impossible position, and raises the question of why Huizenga continues to pay the man millions upon millions a year to not do anything for fear of giving the locker room the idea that it is The Tuna, and not The Snapper (I thought of that one all by myself), that is in charge. Many have argued that Parcells attempted to take a back seat as best he could in New York, because of the relentless media. But, did that serve the locker room well?

    Many argue that Cam Cameron just was not a leader of the locker room, and when the players (Joey Porter especially) began laying into him, it was because he was seen as not being strong enough, not stepping up to the plate and stopping the fight that broke out between Vernon Carey and Keith Traylor, not stepping up to the plate and answering Joey Porter's criticisms with a pissing match. The problem was a perceived leadership void from the man that was supposed to be in charge of the team.

    So how did the New York locker room feel when the man they all considered to be the real head honcho, avoided the football field on game days, didn't sit in on unit or team meetings, never addressed the team publicly, and tried to do his best to keep his hands off normal Head Coach duties? How did it feel when fate tossed in a few gasoline-soaked sticks of dynamite in the form of two separate three-game losing streaks? Could that happen in Miami? Why not?

    And back to the original question, if Tony Sparano snubs the Dolphins in favor of the Baltimore Ravens, wouldn't that severely increase the chances of Parcells' hire going down as a franchise mistake? Do the Jets feel they have a moral victory for having had Bill Belichick technically their head coach for the span of a few days?

    The right thing for Bill Parcells to do is to continue his role as the architect of a winning team structure...and then to resign his position after the NFL Draft.

    That's right, Bill Parcells should resign as Vice President of Football Operations, Owner's Designee, Big Cheese, or whatever he is officially called. I am taking his job description at face value based on what he himself has said to the press since accepting this job. There were two aspects of this job.

    One, he is being paid to put into place a winning organizational structure. He went on to describe a General Manager position that would have full control over football decisions, a scouting and personnel staff that share his philosophies, a segment in charge of player development, and finally a coaching staff. He described his job as basically one of an architect. As an architect, you draw out the plans of a house, and you advise the builder through the construction process just as Bill Parcells is helping Jeff Ireland put together the coaching staff. But, do you design yourself your own bedroom in the house so that you can reside in it and make sure folks living there don't mark the walls or scuff up the floors?

    The second part of Bill's job description was as an adviser to a young Head Coach. He would like to be a resource for a younger Head Coach, so that he can be used for advice on certain "technical aspects" of being a Head Coach (in Bill's own words). But tell me, is it necessary to be on the team's payroll as the Big Cheese, the Head Honcho, the Overseer of All Things Football, in order to give a friend some advice? Is it worth risking the locker room deciding that one guy, and not the other, is the real power in Miami?

    The reality of the situation is that even if The Tuna is not compelled to tender his resignation in an official, publicity-filled way, he will need to do it in a very de facto, convincing manner in order prevent Tony Sparano's being constantly measured up to and compared with The Tuna, and to prevent the players viewing The Tuna's presence as the Sword of Damocles hanging above Sparano's head. It's nice while the team is at 0-0 to sit here and say, that can't happen. Players will know better. But, fans always did underestimate the power of the L-word (not that L-word). It was nice when the majority of board-goers, including some of the more venerable members, argued with me tooth and nail back in October that the thought of firing Cameron or Mueller, even on the back of a 1-15 or 0-16 season, was preposterous. But, the L's kept a'piling up, and now ironically the situation has been reversed (how did THAT happen?).

    If Parcells got bored sitting at a desk job as a television analyst, will he be able to get his kicks while minimizing his position and workload with the Dolphins as much as possible, in order to prevent giving players the wrong idea. My bets say no, and for that reason Tony Sparano should pull a Belichick, if the Ravens will have him. I'm guessing that if the Ravens make the offer, he will.
     
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  3. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    seems like Jerry Jones is doing with the Cowboys what you fear Parcells is doing with the Dolphins.

    Cowboys look pretty good to me...
     
  4. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    I don't want a guy who doesn't want the challenge of trying to rebuild our team. That shows me the guy doesn't have the $%*@! it takes to do the job
     
  5. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    If Sparano wants the Ravens job then I'd say "go to Baltimore then". Why would we want a guy who doesn't WANT to be the Dolphins Head Coach
     
  6. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    i'm really shocked at this thread.

    let me get this straight:

    you still would prefer having Wayne Huizenga as the final say over football operations?
     
  7. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    OMG, Wayne Huizenga having final say over personnel etc.? Good Lord I'd rather have 5 root canals with no pain killers.
     
  8. Nublar7

    Nublar7 Senior Member

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    I got a good chuckle out of this thread.
     
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  9. phinfanuk

    phinfanuk Season Ticket Holder

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    I think you missed the point. Having Parcells around is setting up any rookie head coach to fail.
     
  10. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    No, I would prefer Bill Parcells hire his GM, which he has, help his GM find his scouting and personnel staff, help him hire the Head Coach, help hire the assistant coaches, and help the team get through it's first draft...

    ...and then leave.

    From there, let Sparano and Ireland handle it. If Bill Parcells knows what he is doing, those two should be more than capable. If Bill Parcells did not know what he was doing when he hired Sparano and Ireland, why would you want Bill to continue here?
     
  11. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    And who evaluates Ireland and Sparano? Being 'more than capable' does not mean perfect. Someone better may be available.

    What happens if Ireland retires after this season?

    Basically you are saying that NFL GM's require no oversight???
     
  12. NorFlaFin

    NorFlaFin Active Member

    I'm going to guess that's exactly what will happen......

    Bill is 66-67 years and I seriously doubt he'll finish more then 2 years of his four year deal.
     
  13. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    66-67?

    He is the VP of football operations...not a head coach, he'll be working in the NFL for atleast another 7-8 years
     
  14. gunn34

    gunn34 I miss Don & Dan

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    This is a rough business. Most coaches have 1 shot at making it. Fail and they may not get another shot. IMO Cam and Randy were trying to build a team with no talent. (I blame Wanny for that). I thought they were on the right track. Too bad they were not given another year.
     
  15. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    Ireland retire? Uh he's only 37 years old, not 67
     
  16. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    Thats not the point. He could leave for any reason.

    And if CK had his way, Wayne would select his replacement
     
  17. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    If that happened, we'd all jump off a cliff together
     
  18. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    Tell me about.

    The biggest problem for this franchise is Wayne Huizenga's lack of any understanding of the NFL. He's been a follower, not a leader.

    Once we get someone with some football acumen, CK wants him to quit :confused2::confused2::confused2:
     
  19. Bpk

    Bpk Premium Member Luxury Box

    Great, now you've given me something new to fret over. Cogently argued, and I don't disagree with the potential for this to happen. Of course, as much as I try to predict and speculate on what will happen with football, i am inevitably surprised by events taking a surprising turn. Even more surprisingly, upon later reflection these things always make sene. "Why didn't I see that coming? All the signs were there!"

    What I am saying is, the Parcells-Effect, as you describe it, won't happen. Why not? because we can extrapolate it and therefore it won't come to pass. Instead, something we don't expect will happen.

    Team dynamics are so complex and every mixture of personalities (Head Coach, Assistants, Player egos, personal lives -such as Nick Saban's wife's influence on him when he doubted whether to stay-, etc.) combined with the competitive realities (talent level, injuries, oppoenents, expectations of the team, etc.) make every season, every team, every situation as unique as a fingerprint.

    I agree with the dangers you've cited. But now, let's watch the unpredictable unfold.

    I've given up expecting things.

    Bpk in LA
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Here's to the 2006 Miami Dolphins - The Press Crowned Their *** Champs
     
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  20. Nublar7

    Nublar7 Senior Member

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    Parcells is going to be here at least three years, he may even stay the length of his contract(4 years). Yes, his main objective is to put the structure in place, but who is going to evaluate this structure if he isn't there?

    Say Parcells does the ridiculous(he won't, he is too smart) and quits after the draft. In three years who is going to evaluate this structure and decide if some tweaks have to be made? Without Parcells, we are back to square one with Huizenga making the calls.

    I look at Parcells as a mini owner. With past Dolphin teams, we had the coach and a GM(not in all the years though). The only guy above them was Huizenga. A guy with a lot of money and no clue on how to build a football team. The thing this team needed for years was an owner with a lot of money and a football knowledge that could help turn this around. Instead of selling the team to a football minded owner, he did the best thing in hiring a football mind to run the show. So now we have the money and a guy above the coach and GM with the knowledge.

    Believe me, the way we have structured the front office may be the way teams do it in the future.
     
  21. big0mar

    big0mar New Member

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    Parcell's role is going to be exactly that of the active-owners in the NFL, e.g. Jerry Jones
     
  22. phintim

    phintim New Member

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    Interesting points CK and I can see your point. Right now you are saying we are on the right path as long as Bill gets the organization in place and then leaves but if he stays around long term it is a problem. Well that can still work. I would not go out on a limb and saing we are going to be a winner yet though. I do feel better now than when Cam was hired. I hate to see us starting over again though and maybe Cam would have worked out. I just never beleived he would work out in the first place but hoped he would. I will stick by comments I have been making for awhile that when Cam lost the locker room with his players coupled with what the Dolphins record was there was no way for him to stick around any longer.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2008
  23. texanphinatic

    texanphinatic Senior Member

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    I agree here. Parcells is the architect, Ireland the engineer, and the head coach will be the foreman. Id rather have Parcells here for a few years than have him run off and leave Wayne in charge again.
     
  24. Passrusher

    Passrusher New Member

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    Wayne needs to keep his hands out of ANY personnel stuff regarding football. The man can turn a brick of gold into a pile of steaming crap when it comes to football.
     
  25. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    This "who is going to oversee Ireland and Sparano" stuff could go in ridiculous circles.

    Who is going to oversee Parcells? OH NO!!! WE NEED ANOTHER FOOTBALL GUY TO OVERSEE THE FOOTBALL GUY!!!!

    Bill Parcells hired Jeff Ireland to be the guy with final say over all football decisions. It's in his contract. It is the reason why he was able to leave his contract in Dallas unfulfilled. Jerry Jones gave his blessing, but he could have challenged the move, and he probably would have lost because supposedly the Dolphins have nailed it up ironclad in the contracts to where Ireland's position is a "final say" GM position in the NFL. So, yes, Jeff Ireland is the guy that has to hire the head coach, not Bill Parcells.

    On a de facto basis, you know that Ireland will defer to his mentor, Bill Parcells. But, he doesn't have to.

    So you guys keep ridiculously asking who is going to oversee Ireland and Sparano, without acknowledging that every owner in the NFL has to, at some point, decide who in his organization will make the football decisions. Huizenga still has to keep oversight of Parcells, and ya'll are acting like the man is completely infallible.
     
  26. REV KEV

    REV KEV New Member

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    :stupid:
     
  27. wpgfishfan

    wpgfishfan Member

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    Another one of CK's novels!!

    Parcells might quit before his contract is done but not after this draft.

    He will stay on for at least a year to see if he likes being the "owner"

    This gig is set up so sweet for him he could do this for 5-10 years
     
  28. wpgfishfan

    wpgfishfan Member

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    Who was overseeing Wanny
    Who was overseeing Satan
    Who was overseeing CamRam

    All 3 football minds that destroyed our franchise
     
  29. dredd1050

    dredd1050 New Member

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    Sparano will be the Dolphins head coach. Mark it.
     
  30. REV KEV

    REV KEV New Member

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    Uh oh..., that bit about the TE means that Ginn and Beck might not make it as professionals..., because the coach is riding their ____ (fill in blank) That's OK with me...! We shouldn't draft "soft" athletes I guess...

    Thankfully someonme is going to drive them to their very best...

    These are millionaires people the coach GM and VP can do whatever the hell motivates their guys..., Anthony (Whatever his name is?) Sounded overmtached beacuse he couldn't enjoy himself..., Mark Bavaro, LT, and a host of others looked happy....

    Fear-mongering gets you nowhere...
     
  31. ChambersWI

    ChambersWI Banned

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    ck I always appreciate your posts, and this was very insightfull, but I dunno if I agree with what you wrote. I'm not saying you are a Parcells hater, I know you don't hate Parcells, but man you seem, hate to say it, bitter. You, and a couple other VIPs (not many but a couple) have all seemed uncharacteristically bitter after Cam got fired (which is odd since most of you hated the hire in the first place).

    I dunno man, but I'd rather hook my wagon to Parcells (who has a track record of turning teams around) and Ireland than to Mueller (although I liked him) and Cam (who I have admitted many times made me hate him as a coach more and more with each passing week)
     
  32. ATLFINFAN

    ATLFINFAN Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Sorry CK, but I disagree with you on this on, big time. This makes about as much sense as a CEO hiring all of 'HIS' people to run the day to day operations, and then quiting so he doesnt get to involved. Mr. H. hired him to ' run the football side of the organization' because it wasnt working the way it had been run. It is a new day in Dolphin town. I hope he stays, and would bet the farm he does. Nice try though.
     
  33. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    This isnt about Cameron and Mueller. This is about what happened in New York when the Jets handed Parcells virtually the same role he has now, and whether or not that can happen again.

    It could quite literally happen again. Tony Sparano is Parcells' guy just like Bill Belichick was Parcells' guy back in 2000. Belichick bolted because he didn't want to face the impossible task of trying to get the locker room to respect HIM as their new coach while Parcells is a busy body working the personnel, talking to the players every day, and being Bill Parcells. Tony Sparano could decide to do the same. Parcells was left with his second choice, Al Groh, who basically cracked (along with his locker room) under the strain of the situation of being viewed as Parcells' puppet.
     
  34. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    Last time I checked, the CEO is actively involved in leading a company.

    Last time I checked, the Head Coach functions as the leader of a football team.

    Nice try though.
     
  35. ATLFINFAN

    ATLFINFAN Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    No, I think MOST CEO's oversee the whole shebang, but then stays out of the way on day to day things. They have to hire guys they trust to make the daily operations run right. He/ she is mainly involved in the BIG decisions that have a direct impact on the companys future. But, we can disagree on this, no biggie.
     
  36. lbmclean_sj

    lbmclean_sj New Member

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    with all that has happened to Wayne's plans in the past, I would not be suprised if Parcells' ended up meddling and making for a disfunctional organization

    maybe Bill can learn from his mistakes and keep his hands off, who knows

    if Bill stayed in his office and helped the new HC on the HC's terms that would be great.

    there i nothing wrong with a CEO creating and implementing his culture and vision as long as he does it through/in concert with his direct subs

    instead of talking to the players, Bill should simply have a periodic review with the coaches and come to an agreement on corrective actions
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2008
    sgtphin likes this.
  37. aquaman

    aquaman Season Ticket Holder

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    Ok, I have not signed up here waiting for finheaven to reemerge but cks post made me do it. First of all Ck is, as you all know one of the most respected posters in this family and his opinions always hold weight. I see what hes trying to do here and its rooted in a deep worry that the team may get better but not stronger. All I can say is we havent had a guy in here steering the ship on a proper course since JJ left. Yes, I know, the offensive players he drafted were crap but, the D was solid for many years because of him.

    I like the fact that we have a guy who commands the respect that Bill does. I love that he has a plan and that no one, not Wayne, not Joe Bailey not anyone can stand up to him and say " I know how we can do it better" because they dont. Wayne turned the team over to a man who has a plan and that plan is to implement a structure that will allow this once proud team and fan base to enjoy Sundays again.

    Parcells can and will make this team better...even by default, we cant get worse. If he does leave in two years or so Im sure we will all admire him for what he left behind. This year we learn to crawl, next season to walk and by year three we should be running. Have hope fans, its all we've had the last 3 regime changes...difference is this one should make our pain go away. :up:
     
  38. ac_lanham

    ac_lanham Junior Member

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    I'm sorry, but the right track isn't 1-15 after going 6-10 and then puffing your chest and proclaiming that this team is a playoff team based on talent alone. Talent? Where? Do tell. The right track isn't losing your locker room, and especially losing the two veterans who have been the face of the team. They both made this festering mess worse.
     
    endorPHINS72 likes this.
  39. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Draft Forum Moderator Luxury Box

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    Head coaches oversee their coordinators, they don't usually call the plays during the game. It's the same thing, to me.
     
  40. ac_lanham

    ac_lanham Junior Member

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    Hopefully Bill has sense enough to not make the same mistakes that he did with the Jets. Let's give him a try to and see. I think we can all agree that we'd rather see Bill making the football decisions over Huizenga or some crappy head coach and/or GM that he hired.
     

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