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High school coaching as a job

Discussion in 'Jobs Forum' started by Nappy Roots, Jan 17, 2019.

  1. Nappy Roots

    Nappy Roots Well-Known Member

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    A writing career pays a lot more than a coaching gig.
     
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  2. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    LOL, I'm not so sure....I have a very prominent writing career.
     
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  3. Nappy Roots

    Nappy Roots Well-Known Member

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    Those high school coaches make about $5k for the year unfortunately.
     
  4. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    upload_2019-1-17_14-14-46.png
     
  5. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    The nation wide average for a high school football coach is, as of Jan 2019, $67,000 per year.
     
  6. mbsinmisc

    mbsinmisc Season Ticket Holder

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    Does that include their teacher's salary?
     
  7. AGuyNamedAlex

    AGuyNamedAlex Well-Known Member

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    If it doesn't, I'd imagine Private Institutions are paying much more.
     
  8. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Nope...most high school coaches nowadays just coach
     
  9. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Nope...private school teachers and coaches, on average, earn less.
     
  10. texanphinatic

    texanphinatic Senior Member

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    The head coach in premier divisions maybe.

    The assistant coaches rarely are not teachers first, and most of the lower ranking divisions even the head coach will be a teacher in some fashion.
     
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  11. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    True...I was talking about HC's. However, it's becoming more and more common that high schools, even smaller ones, have coaches that are not teachers. They do have other jobs, but they are insurance salesmen, lawyers, or even the school's athletic director and they make decent money at coaching.
     
  12. AGuyNamedAlex

    AGuyNamedAlex Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to see stats to back that up because in my experience with the people Ive known its the opposite.

    I suppose that could depend on district though.
     
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  13. Nappy Roots

    Nappy Roots Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe those numbers for a second. Majority of football head coaches are also school athletic directors. This number has to include whatever roll they are in with the school.
     
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  14. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Salaries and Benefits
    Public school teachers tend to be paid more than private school teachers. Of course, this varies with the school and the school district and additionally, private school packages may include better benefits. Even as school districts across the U.S. struggle with financial challenges, many offer higher salaries to both new and established teachers. They also offer generous benefits like pensions, paid sick and holiday leave, and college tuition reimbursement.

    In contrast, private schools typically subsist on donations to the organization or church that sponsors them. They do not receive state or federal subsidies that they can in turn use to pay teacher salaries. If you teach in a private school, you may receive significantly less in pay than if you were to teach in a public school. You may also receive only basic benefits like health insurance and minimal paid sick leave.

    http://teacherhabits.com/teaching-at-a-private-school-versus-teaching-at-a-public-school/


    Most private school teachers are paid less than their public school counterparts. Private schools can have different pay scales because of factors such as the size of the student body, funding sources and accreditation requirements. Teachers choose to work at private schools for reasons such as manageable class sizes and more freedom of teaching practices.

    https://work.chron.com/private-school-teacher-pay-scale-3212.html


    It has been a popular belief that private schools pay higher teacher salaries than public schools because most private industry jobs pay higher than public positions. However, the average salary for a private school teacher in $35,342, according to Payscale.com in December 2010, more than 20 percent less than public school teachers. This may be partly because many private schools do not require state certification from their educators, although it is recommended and would likely bring a higher salary.

    https://careertrend.com/public-school-vs-private-school-teacher-salaries-12448435.html
     
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  15. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Not true. Most HC's are not the school's athletic director. Some are, but not most.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics coaches working in high schools and elementary schools made $34,800 on average (www.bls.gov). This is the earnings of those who coach all types of sports (not just football) and who don't hold teacher certification.

    Sure, some po-dunk high school with 57 students isn't going to have a full time football coach making $50K per year. However, when talking about schools that have full time HC's that don't teach, and a lot do, they make a lot of money.


    For example, in the western part of North Carolina there are 24 head football coaches. 21 are full-time with 3 of those 21 also being athletic directors. None teach. They average $60K per year. The 3 coaches that are athletic directors make: $70K, $66K, and $63K. The highest paid coach makes $73K and does nothing but coach.
     
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  16. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    You're not in that area, are you? I live right on the state line in the Western part of the Carolinas....funny you used that particular area as an analogy.

    LOL, since you jerks can't stop arguing and a mod will eventually show up, I have a sugggestion- a ThePhins.com member map! Integrate with Google Maps, have each member add a city, state, then we can see where everyone is in the world.

    J/K about the arguing, by the way!
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019
  17. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    lol...No, but I was stationed at Cherry Point when in the Marines. That's in the eastern part of the state, but I volunteered at some local high schools and followed high school football from all over the state. I remembered talking to some of the HC's of these teams and how they said it was their only job and they made decent money etc. So I Googled North Carolina football coaches and got that info.

    However, many other states are just like N. Carolina in regards to high school football.
     
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  18. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    High school football is serious in this area because there's not as much going on. It's not uncommon to see 2-5k people at a game n a typical Friday night. My kid's team has gone to the state championship 2 years in a row (lost in semi's this season) and we've seen a few 10k crowds....that amazes me since most div III schools don't get that kind of turnout.
     
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  19. Unlucky 13

    Unlucky 13 Just a Guy Staff Member Club Member

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    That's insane that it can be that high in some places. My brother in law has been an assistant coach at the high school he teaches at for almost 15 years. They dont have OC and DC, just HC and assistants. He makes about 3k for the year as a bonus to his teacher's salary for doing it, and puts in about 20 hours a week, plus travel. There has always been a rule in the state (WV) that coaches at public schools have to be teachers within the county school system. Most of them are phys ed and drivers ed.

    In my current area, the rules are very similar. Public HS coaches have to be teachers, and what they get paid is a bonus on top of their salary. Only they don't take it very seriously down here, and head coaches tend to flip pretty quickly because of that. Sort of a "I don't want to do it any more, your turn" kind of deal. My wife's cousin teaches at the middle school, and he's an assistant coach on both the HS football and basketball teams, and said he makes about 1k each for them.
     
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  20. mbsinmisc

    mbsinmisc Season Ticket Holder

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    That just proves how far out of the loop my old *** has become.
     
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  21. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    It's juts crazy in places like Texas, Cali, Florida, and some others. Head football coaches making $150k per year and they don't teach or do anything else.
     
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