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What would you do?

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by danmarino, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Some of you know that I work in the medical field and in a cath lab. I have a wife and 5 kids. The youngest being 5 months and the oldest being 8.

    Saying that, I love my work. It's exciting and fulfilling. However, my hours are crazy. There are some days that I will work 17-20 hours straight without so much as a break. I'm on call nearly half the time for up to 3-4 days in a row, and it's not uncommon to work 40-50 hours in a weekend.

    I've been offered a position at the hospital I work for. Basically, I'd be a provider trainer for our electronic medical record(EMR). What this means is, I would be the person that shows all of the hospital providers how to use and set up the EMR. I would work Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm-ish. No weekends, nights, or holidays. And to top it off I'd get a pay raise. (This last part baffles me to think that I'd get more money when I'm not saving a life. I guess that's the way medicine is going now.)

    Anyhow, I'm 43 years old and can't work in the Cath Lab forever...at least not these hours etc. I was a Marine for nearly 10 years, Army Reserve and a fire medic for a few year after that, and now this so I've had my share of adrenaline rushes and excitement, but I'd be lying if I said I don't still enjoy it.

    I know my wife and kids would absolutely love me working normal hours. And frankly I would too and the thought of never missing a Christmas again sounds fantastic. The extra money isn't needed per se, but I do have 4 daughters and weddings may put me in the poor house. lol


    So, what would you do? Anyone go through something similar before? Any advice?

    Thanks for reading all of this...
     
  2. McLovin

    McLovin Resident Pats fan.

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    I'd say you need to mull-et this over with some piping hot grub from Bob Evans. Put the wheels back on the Camarostang, roll that sum a ***** down the hill and drop the clutch cause yous eating fancy tonight! Ye haw!

    oh, sorry, thought i was in the an 18 year likes me thread still.

    um, take the job, sounds like you have already justified since you really didnt offer any negatives.
     
  3. Unlucky 13

    Unlucky 13 Team Rosen Staff Member Club Member

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    Unless doing the current job is the best thing you could ever think of, I agree that there seems to be absolutely zero downside to taking the move. Better pay PLUS incredibly better hours? Dude, do it! To me, it seems like an amazing break of good fortune!

    I'm the dad of two young kids, not five, but I can't imagine ever going back to working crazy hours, weekends and holidays again. I worked retail for 14 years before being laid off about four years ago, and have been a stay at home dad since. Missing a lot of my older daughter's life the first couple of years stunk and I'm not going back to that. My wife earns enough thankfully that when I eventually go back to work in a few years, I'll be able to be choosy and make sure that I take something where I'm dayshift M-F also. I'm presuming that will mean lower pay and benefits.

    For you to have that chance with MORE pay? Again, do it yesterday!
     
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  4. Fin D

    Fin D Sigh Club Member

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    Look at like this:

    In 20 years which would you regret more...

    - taking a job you like less, but pays more and gives you more time

    OR

    - missing a lot of your family while they grow up...for a job
     
  5. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Thanks for the responses.

    I accepted the new position this morning. I won't start until the cath lab has a replacement for me which could take a few weeks. I told them that I'd still help them out with call from time to time, too. Maybe pick up an evening night once in awhile.
     
  6. cuchulainn

    cuchulainn Táin Bó Cúailnge Club Member

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    Congrats. It should really be worth it. Enjoy as much time as possible with the kids while you can. I've got 3 leaving in Jan. 2 for college and 1 for the Air Force. I'm missing them already.
     
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  7. Fin D

    Fin D Sigh Club Member

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    Well done, much respect.
     
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  8. Boik14

    Boik14 Admin Club Member Retired Administrator

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    This.

    Congrats on the new job Dan. More money and better hours sounds like a win to me.
     
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  9. Ohio Fanatic

    Ohio Fanatic 30 years and counting Club Member

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    seems pretty straightforward to me. Like you said, you can't keep doing those hours forever. and if your kids get older and you realize you missed out on everything, you will regret it and unable to change it. It might be different if your extended hours was going to get you to be head of the cath lab.

    [EDIT] saw your acceptance, congrats! now more time for your kids to drive you crazy :bighug:
     
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  10. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Thanks! There was the opportunity for advancement to become the manager of the Cath Lab, and even though there would be no call, holidays, or nights, I could not do that job. The turnover rate is sky high and I think I'd end up going crazy trying to please everyone.
     
  11. Aqua4Ever04

    Aqua4Ever04 Write Travis Write Club Member

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    Obviously everyone is different, but this seems like a no-brainer to me.
     
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  12. eltos_lightfoot

    eltos_lightfoot Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Congratulations, Dan!!!! I think you made the right decision! I like the “keeping your hand in” part to deal with the transition.
     
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  13. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I didn't see this until now....I never think to look in the off-topic forums (even when I ask a question here).

    Here's how I see it, and I'm speaking from experience since I worked in a hospital one summer as a warehouse manager (I stocked supplies/equipment throughout the entire hospital). I got to know all of executives and saw a lot more than I probably was supposed to, so my opinion may be unique enough to help. LOL, I have to say this...I was screwing the hospital president's daughter....that's how I got the job in the first place. So I was very well connected and all the big-wigs wanted to be my friend. I lost the job shortly after I broke up with the daughter though...otherwise I might be running that hospital today since I was so good at playing the game. Hospitals are way too political.

    First off, you're in your 40's and have off the charts job security- you could move anywhere in the US and have a job within a week. The only downside is that your job doesn't pay great...it's good money but not "I'm gonna buy me a Cadillac" type of dough. And the only way you can change that in healthcare is by climbing the totem pole.

    The ABSOLUTE WORST thing that can happen is you take this promotion, you're horrible at it and they fire you- that means you're going to have to find another job making about the same pay and with the same benefits as you have today. Now, you are earning those overtime checks now though so that's also a negative...will you miss that money? If so, there's something to think about. If not, then it's a no-brainer...take the promotion.

    What's the ABSOLUTE BEST thing that can happen though? You like the job and do well. They see you as versatile and offer you a Jr. management position...and that starts your climb up the corporate ladder before retirement. Maybe you end up a department head in 10 years and retire from boredom....there's nothing but positive there.

    Overall, i don't see how you don't take the position....it's the right move and it's way better for your family. Just don't screw the president's daughter and everything will work out fine. =)
     
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  14. ToddPhin

    ToddPhin RIP Phinsational Luxury Box Club Member

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    Wait, so do you shove tubes up wieners all day long in this cath lab? That's the more pressing question here.
     
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  15. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    lol...I assist interventional cardiologists with placing stents in hearts. Cath Lab = catheterization laboratory. But the cath lab I work for is combined with IR. (Interventional Radiology) Very rarely do we use general anesthesia on our patients so they do not have a foley catheter ("wiener tube"). However, on the rare occasions that we use general anesthesia a nurse will insert the foley.
     
  16. ToddPhin

    ToddPhin RIP Phinsational Luxury Box Club Member

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    ....but then you pull it out right?
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  17. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    Hey, that's pretty cool- I had two stints put in last year. I'll give some quick feedback-

    1) They said that they could go in from the groin or the arm....but they also said I didn't want them to go in through the groin if at all possible. HOLY **** I COMPLETELY AGREE. They put that thing in my arm and it hurt like mad at first, and after the surgery it felt like I had a broken arm for three weeks. I broke my other arm as a kid so I know what that feels like.....THANK GOD they didn't go in through the groin!

    2) I'm not sure what they drugged me up with, but I remember them being pretty good into the surgery and I "woke up". So I was looking around the table, touching stuff and got yelled at by the doctor to stay still. My reply- "I'm bored!" The nurse laughed and the doctor yelled at her too...that made me happy! I was super doped up and I had no idea what was going on...but I also remember a decent bit of it. Very strange experience.

    I'm not sure why...I just felt like I needed to share that. =)
     
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  18. CaribPhin

    CaribPhin Guest

    Unless water sports is REALLY your thing, there's no reason to not take the new gig IMO.
     
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  19. vurdokcerk

    vurdokcerk New Member

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    You need to set priorities for yourself. I think you should work where you like the most
     
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  20. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    lol...Nope.

    I have 5 kids. I never pull anything out.
     
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  21. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I'm surprised you had that much pain. The doc must have hit a nerve pretty good.

    It was most likely versed and fentanyl. Those are the 2 drugs of choice for sedation in most cath labs. The versed is used more as an amnesic and the fentanyl for pain and relaxation. Some people remember everything and some remember nothing.

    The radial approach is relatively newer in this country, but mortality rates are a lot lower when cath's are performed this way. The main complication from a heart cath is bleeding and the radial artery is a lot smaller than the femoral. Also, when they go through the femoral you have to lay on your back anywhere from 4-12 hrs depending on if a stent was inserted, if the doc used a closure device and also what the patient's coag factors are...pt/inr etc. Anyhow, both ways can be painful, but most patients report less pain through the radial.

    I'm glad everything worked out for you! Where did you get the stents...do you know?
     
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  22. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Too late... Todd beat you (pun intended) to this joke.
     
  23. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    The stents went in the far left two valves...I think #1 was 90% closed and #2 was 60% closed. #3 was 40% blocked but they left that one alone. My total cholesterol was 161 though and both my good/bad cholesterol was low, so my regular family doctor was pretty surprised by that.

    I had a heart attack in my sleep, the pain woke me up and I thought it was indigestion so I got out of bed and tried to walk it off. So I was pacing around for maybe 30 minutes and then something big hit, it doubled me over and I started crying from the pain. It only lasted maybe 30-45 seconds though and I thought, there's no way that was a heart attack....I probably argued with my wife for 15 minutes over going to the hospital. I compromised and drove myself to urgent care, they checked me out and said the heart was fine, but there were also signs I just had a heart attack because of an elevated <something levels>.

    That doctor let me drive myself to the ER though because I was so stable. He said it was the first time he didn't insist on an ambulance with something like that. The hospital did some tests, admitted me, and then I was in surgery that following morning. They let me leave the morning after that- I think I was there about 45 hours total and I never really got any answers....which seriously sucked. I was too out of it when the doctor came in though and then the next morning, I was in the bathroom when he swung by. He signed my release chart without talking to me and I was so ready to get out of there, I didn't think to stick around. I really should have talked to him first.

    With the stints, you randomly get pain probably the first month....and every time I'd think, oh crap, I'd better pop a nitro pill. But they say if you do and you're not having a heart attack, you'll get the worst headache of your life. So I never took one so far (knock on wood) and I'm still here.

    My right arm though....I'd lift a glass of water and almost drop the cup from the pain. I couldn't lift anything at all for a good 2 1/2 weeks. So I'm very thankful they didn't have to go through the groin!
     
  24. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I really hope you didn't get a stent in any valve..lol... Look at your stent card it should tell you which artery(ies) you received the stents.

    If three different vessels had a 90%, 60%, and 40% blockage I'm surprised they didn't recommend a CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Graft....open heart) for you. Three vessel disease is typically CABG time. But, if you have only one vessel under 50% stents are typically not indicated. They will treat with medicine.

    Elevated troponin in blood work or ST elevation on an EKG?

    And yeah, post stent chest pain is common, but don't ignore chest pain. And taking nitro with or without angina (chest pain) can give you a headache so maybe err on the side of caution. Just don't overdue it or you'll bottom out your blood pressure.

    Glad to hear you're feeling better.
     
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  25. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I have a stent card- I'll have to ask my wife. I was still out of it the next morning when they released us so I went home without any answers. They identified the heart attack by the elevation of something in the EKG...it seems like they said it was a .26 after the initial test? They said it was low but definitely higher than normal unless I had a heart attack, so that was the only "proof". I mean, I believe them if they say it was a heart attack....I just wasn't that impressed by the whole thing since the pain was only serious for 40-60 seconds (after 30 minutes of mild pain). Then I felt fine again. It's a very strange experience to say the least.

    It's been 13 months since the heart attack/stents and they say all the numbers look excellent with blood work and EKG's; the cardiac doctor said to follow up again in 2 years unless something happens. So I think I'm on the right path anyway.

    I'll definitely ask about the stent card though....that sounds important!

    Oh, and it may have been 80%, 60% and 40%....I'm pretty sure they said 90 though for the main one. They've had me on 4 different drugs for it though over the past year plus the blood thinner (I stopped that last month). They told me I'll have to take that stuff for life.
     
  26. danmarino

    danmarino Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I think you’re conflating a troponin level with an ST elevation. The former is a cardiac marker derived from a blood test. Normal levels are <.01. So a .26 is really high. Although, I’ve seen levels as high as 80. (That’s 80... no decimal before that) The latter, ST elevation, is a segment of an EKG that possibly shows infarct. Which is lack of oxygen to the muscle.

    Also, stents are placed in vessels, not valves. That’s why I wrote what I did initially. Most stents are placed in the right coronary artery (RCA), left coronary artery (LCA), or the circumflex artery (Circ). There are other branches that come off of these three that if big enough may warrant a stent.

    Also, the left main artery, (LM), is sometimes stented, but more often if there is a blockage here the patient gets bypass.
     
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  27. KeyFin

    KeyFin Well-Known Member

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    Gotcha....thanks. My wife said I didn't get a stent card so I'll probably have to look at my charts to figure out what they did. Also, my wife said the blockages were 90%, 60% and minimal blockage to the 3rd artery...she said the doc never actually gave it a number. It's kind of pathetic I didn't realise they weren't in valves, but like I said...they rushed me through very fast and I might have talked to the doctor a total of 2 minutes. There was no initial consult or anything, it was just relayed by the nurse.

    I appreciate the quick lesson though!
     
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